Archive for the ‘ Editing ’ Category

Writers and Holidays

Working writers have few days off. The stories are always there, constant companions demanding freedom. Characters, both the living and dead, drop in for a cup of coffee, and afternoon drink, a glass of wine, to discuss their worlds, which are more real than the default writers space.

The Fourth of July, a day like any other, a work day, with the manuscript calling demanding closure for plot holes and poor grammar and character flat character arcs.

Which leads me to my upcoming novel, Twilight’s Child.

“Twilight’s Child” is a Young Adult Fantasy Novel (12-18 years old) of 94,000 words (74 Scenes divided into 36 chapters) going through a final edit, and due for completion on July 31. I am seeking Beta Readers, an editor, and cover artists.

Twilights Child Elevator Pitch:

An eleven-year-old boy discovers he is a changeling, a faerie exchanged for a human child as part of the Tithe to hell and returns to the Twilight World of the Fae to rescue the child whose life he took.

Read “Shift.” Now Available at Amazon in eBook and Paper Back Formats.

Editing To be and it’s Conjugal Relations

A posting on the Wordward Press Blog I found an excellent resource on editing.

THE CASE OF THE COPULA OVERDOSE

I read a book a while back that has stayed with me for many months and has affected the way I write and read, and it’s opened my eyes to a weakness in much fiction writing, even in published books. Douglas Glover’s Attack of the Copula Spiders (Biblioasis, 2012) criticizes many aspects of fiction, but saves its most withering scorn for the rampant and indiscriminate use of copulas.

I hear you asking, “What’s a copula?” I admit I had to look it up. Webster’s definition says: “the connecting link between subject and predicate of a proposition.” In most cases, this refers to a form of the word “be.” But what does that mean to us everyday writers? It means banal, didactic, often passive sentences, almost completely lacking in action or depth.

As Glover says: “A copula spider occurs when a student uses the verb ‘to be’ so many times on a page that I can circle all the instances, connect them with lines, and draw a spider diagram. Now there is nothing grammatically wrong with the verb ‘to be,’ but if you use it over and over again your prose is likely to be flaccid and uninteresting.”

An excellent resource for editing.

Over-Prepping – Light Bulb

Writer, Lara Lalalynn, (Facebook Friend) posted today about the perils of Over-Prepping, by which she meant TOO MANY PREPOSITIONS.

To-whit

Over-prepping is using superfluous prepositional phrases–often redundant, but also just unnecessary for meaning/clarity. And as with all evil things, it adds to verbosity and will kill pace.”

By Lara Lalalynn

I have this problem. In my latest work, it isn’t so bad, which shoes I’ve learned something, but in this process of going back and editing earlier works, I’ve found myself addicted to prepositional phrases. Good writing means we use the right word and no extra words. Those markers of good writing are in conflict.

Going back to edit, I can look for prepositions, and make sure that each one is necessary.