Archive for February, 2019

A Writer on Any Given Sunday

Photo by Plush Design Studio on Unsplash

Wake, and …
Suspicion creeps down my neck.
Not a thinking day. No!
A lark day.
A play day.
A crawl back in bed and mess around day.
Chores, wait till tomorrow.
Hobbies, paint yourself.
Writers deserve days off.
Right?
No stress.
No worries.
Hakuna ma watch-u-ma-call-it
And all that jazz.
So what if …
I left a character
A breath from death
No clue how to live.
An alien shadow
Outside of time
Creeping through the pores in his skin.
I stopped yesterday, not knowing how to save him.
Should I kill him?
Why not?
Abel Ruse, not real.
Not breathing, hoping,
I know what color of underwear he wears.
I know he has the hots for Gaia,
And thinks he is in love.
Not old enough to know
Love from lust?
Or is there a difference.
And he’s changing.
Oh, my!
And the change scares him
More than the knife
Literally at his throat.
How can I desert someone
Living in my head for months
When I know his hopes, dreams,
That his frozen thought
“What color of panties does Gaia wear?”
Not knowing if he will ever know.
Because real people never know
Until the knife at their throat
Cuts.
And then, nothing…

Hard-Earned Writing Wisdom

Does this owl make me look wise?
Photo by Jessy Paston on Unsplash

“Good things happen to those who work at it, but never in a hurry. “
Frank Darbe expressing his sense of frustration by paraphrasing an old proverb.

“Hurry up and Wait is a thing.”
Old Navy saying Frank Darbe relearns every freaking day of his life.

“If at first you don’t learn something, bash your head against the wall a few more times. Wisdom penetrates thick skulls only with encouragement.”
Coined by me, Frank Darbe, while taking three Ibuprofen after a learning experience. 

“Avoiding work is the quickest route to failure, but it proves I, too, can be spectacular at something.”
Anonymous, but really, we all know anonymous is Frank Darbe.

“Coining fake hard-earned wisdom proverbs is avoiding work, by pretending to work and takes more time and effort than work. “
Refer to Frank Darbe’s previous Hard-Earned Wisdom Snippet concerning the avoidance of work.

“A writer pours out both heart and soul for his audience. Though it may only be an audience of one, the writer himself, one can be a damned appreciative audience.
By (applause, applause) the Writer himself. Frank Darbe.

“A 100-word logline is a thesis, not a logline and proves that the writer requires remedial courses in grammar and salesmanship.”
Paraphrased from words spoken by an agent to Frank Darbe at his first Writers and Editors Convention. To which, Frank answered, “What’s a logline?”

“If you never failed at something, you never learned anything. Do you think coming up with good pithy phrases is easy?”
Said by Frank Darbe to his wife when he failed to carry out the trash while coining pithy sayings. Trust Frank, leaning that was painful. He doesn’t sleep well on couches.

“Do not wait for success as a writer. Throw words at your keyboard until the screen vomits, and then self-publish.”
Frank Darbe says, rescue me, I am trapped by a deadline set by monkeys forcing me to write words at random until they become wise.

“That’s it. That’s it. You’re perfect, said no writer ever after penning the first sentence of a fantasy epic for the thousandth time.”
Frank Darbe didn’t say that, and it wasn’t a thousand times really.

“Lists of Hard-Earned wisdom are like goodbyes spoken to visiting relatives, they go on too long but are sincere.”

Just Finish the Darn Book

Photo by Brittani Burns on Unsplash

Walking Shadows

At fifty-four-thousand words, Walking Shadows is close to the end. It has been a long trip, starting, stopping, starting, stopping due to depression, grief, doctors, medicine, and recovery,. Better, I see it within no more than two weeks of “The End.”

I’ve avoided picking it up again because of a bad habit. Hit a rough spot in the book or emotionally, and I start something new. Chasing the new and shiny story is my worst habit as a writer.

Worse, I avoided it because I lost the narrative thread, and because the ending no longer made sense to me. Realizing last night, I was being both unprofessional and a fool, I dusted off the data file. After dithering, I realized that I know how it ends, I just was not sure how to get there from where I last wrote. I started the novel project of writing the last three or so chapter from back to front. It sounds backasswards (one of my favorite words form my Oklahoma childhood) but I can set down and write the last chapter without a hitch, and once I get that done, I will extrapolate backwards until I reach the point where I stopped writing.

And there is something very comforting in writing the last chapter of a long work.

Walking Shadows: After Able Ruse’s mother dies, he is forced to leave the religious community where grew up and live with his strange Grandfather in Scapula, California, haunted by Walking Shadows that stea the souls of children and and and take over their lives.

Things to Do. Stories to Write.

Yesterday, I wrote “How Jimmy Dees Ate the World.

Syinopsis: A who is driven to atheism by mommy issues accidentally swallows a splinter removed from under his fingernail and forced by the thing in his stomach to eat. After emptying his fridge, he eats the refrigerator followed by his house and moves on to the rest of the world only to find his Mother’s stingy and vicious God chose Jimmy to end the world because Jimmy never asked God for so much as a pissant.

The story was fun, but so far the few who commented on it treat it like some odd dog left in in a lump on their porch by a stray dog. Ohe well, I write for myself, and it is rough.

Things To Do

01 – Work on novel daily.
02 – Write a story to submit to Whortleberry Press, for Strange Mysteries 8 with a theme of “A More Perfect Union,” and a max length of 3000 words.
03 – Write a story to submit to Serial Magazine. They have a “Pulp” editorial policy and are looking for 500 – 10,000 words stories. The 7,500 – 10,000-word range is serialized. Genres are action-adventure, science-fiction, mystery, fantasy, horror, thriller, romance, and westerns.